See What I Can See: New Zealand Photography for the Young and Curious

Gregory O'Brien

Author: Gregory O'Brien
Format: Hardback, Ebook
Pages: 112
Published: October 2015
ISBN: 9781869408435
$34.99

Available in Ebook

See What I Can See is an introduction to New Zealand photography that will appeal to young and curious photographers, students of New Zealand art history, or anyone who wants to sample the extraordinary range of images made in this country by our photographers.

Photography was invented the year before the Treaty of Waitangi was signed. Within a few years, cameras were charting the life and times of people at this end of the planet. See What I Can See is a celebration of the camera - the New Zealand that it captured, and the artists who wielded it. It is a book about darkness and light, about careful planning and doing things on the spur of the moment, about the quickness of digital photography and the slowness of old technology. It's a woman driving a tractor and a kid in a Colgate tube, a rock at Ngauruhoe and a Wahine survivor on a cart, it's surfies and selfies and cabbages the size of kings.

Author

More about Gregory O'Brien


Extract

Read an extract here

 

Awards and Nominations

Winner – 2016 PANZ Book Design Awards Edify Award for Best Educational Book – See What I Can See: New Zealand Photography for the Young and Curious, Gregory O'Brien designed by Katrina Duncan (interior), Sarah Maxey (cover)

 

Reviews

If See What I Can See can be considered a guidebook to New Zealand photography, then Gregory O’Brien is our knowledgeable tour guide. - Sarah Jane Burnett, Booksellers NZ

See What I Can See is an introduction to New Zealand photography for young and curious photographers, students of New Zealand art history, or anyone who wants to sample the extraordinary range of images made in this country by our photographers. - Education Today

O’Brien encourages readers to look closely at the photographs to ‘‘see what you can see”. Looking beyond the photographed subject can tell an entirely different story from the first impression you get when seeing a photograph for the first time. –Linda Hall, Hawkes Bay Today